LQP-79 “Zombie Virus” CONFIRMED as Web Scam

The inventor of LQP-79, Alfred Moya

Florida may not be the source of a zombie  virus, but it is home to the primary perpetuator of this myth.

The LQP-79 hoax has been created and actively spread by Florida-based “affordable web pro” Alfred Moya, the ZAC has discovered.

Following our announcement Thursday allaying fears of a “zombie” outbreak following a wave of internet rumor and hysteria set off by last weekend’s biting attack  in Miami, we received a tweet from Moya, who tweets as @affordableweb.  A glance at his feed showed he had been actively tweeting and re-tweeting bits about the virus, particularly a link to a thrown-together wordpress based site LQP-79.org  Moya had also been promoting the site via his channel and comments on Youtube, as well as spamming it to the comment sections of many other websites and articles.

Closer examination reveals that the site was registered to one Alfred Moya, of Ocala, FL, according to its registration information.  Moya, an avid cannabis advocate who says he has been “building websites and writing on the internet since 1999,” also created this oh-so-scientific video on his youtube channel on Thursday to promote the site.

His LQP-79 site began with the infamous “article” screenshot apparently meant to resemble Huffington Post, which blatantly distorts a quote from the quite-real Armando Aguilar of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police.  Aguilar was the first to suggest (and it is, still, only speculation) that the face-eating attack on the causeway last Saturday might have been the result of the mephedrone-type drugs sometimes referred to as “bath salts.” A doctor quoted in the same report called this drug the “the new LSD” (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide-25), and it was probably this that inspired Moya, a dread-locked proponent of marijuana and psychedelics, to coin the fictional new virus “Lysergic Quinine Protein” LQP-79.

The note of parody involved is not without merit to anyone familiar with the way in which law enforcement, politicians, medical personnel and media can sometimes create and perpetuate irresponsible rumors, speculation and hysteria.  The comparison of these “bath salt” drugs to LSD was, at best, misguided.   However, Moya’s propagation of an internet hoax that has induced real fear in some, in which all roads lead back to his site, with its Google ads and prominently featured Paypal widget for donating to “fund research and broadcasting information of this deadly virus!” … well, it doesn’t exactly scream altruistic satire.

Any additional questions about the fictional LQP-79 virus or the motivations for creating this fairly widespread rumor can be directed to

Alfred Moya at the Alfred Moya Foundation 

2345 NE 25th Ave
Ocala, FL
affordableweb@gmail.com  (352)509-5420

*We have contacted PayPal to inquire whether or not they consider this solicitation of funds for researching a fictional disease a violation of their terms of use.

*Special thanks to Crystal the Ninja for conferring with us and assisting with our investigation of this matter.

[-P.E.D.]

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